To Gunnedah from the Writer’s Room.

A few pictures from our stay in Gunnedah.

An impressive monument to an Aboriginal chieftain of the Gunn e darr tribe. The below text is translated from the local dialect. The wiki link will give you a better look at his story.

In times past there was an Aboriginal man called Cumbo Gunnerah His people called him The Red Kangaroo. He was a clever chief and a mighty fighter(this man from Gunnedah) Later, the white people of this place called him The Red Chief. (Dr Margaret Sharpe, Lecturer in Aboriginal Languages, wrote the Kamilaroi text.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gambu_Ganuurru

Cumbo GunerahThis is Gin’s Leap situated between Boggabri and Gunnedah. It is reputed that an Aboriginal maiden of the Kamilaroi tribe was to become the wife of a tribal elder. Not fancying life with an old man she jumped off this cliff to her death with her young lover from another tribe. (shades of Romeo and Juliet here?).  Open this picture in a new window and you will see a white mark in the rock face that looks suspiciously like someone leaping out of the rock.Gin's LeapA view of Gunnedah from Porcupine Lookout. The morning was a tad hazy but it gives you an idea of the great location.GunnedahCotton is a major part of the local economy, this farm is located north of the town and the picture only shows part of it. Because cotton needs so much water these farms usually have huge dams. When I pulled over a large flock of pelicans took off and flew around in circles.CottonfieldsHave you ever tried to pull up safely, find your telephoto lens, switch over, dodge large semi trailers and get a half decent picture? It can be daunting. If you open this in a new window you should get a closer view, although I was going for the overall, ‘bleeding heck look at all the pelicans’ type of effect.Pelicans2  The common pest pear, Opuntia stricta sp. Seemed to have arrived in Australia in the early 18oo’s as a pot plant. It was planted for hedgerows and as stockfeed. By 1920, 60 million acres in New South Wales and Queensland had been covered by the cactus. The introduction of the Cactoblastis Moth eventually destroyed most of the cacti, its larvae ate into the plant. We drove for twenty minutes past hundreds of cactus before I stopped to take a picture of this plant, thinking that they may run out, they didn’t for quite a while. The ground was littered with dead plants and I came to the conclusion – this is not a place to run naked.Prickly Pear cactusI had to lighten this picture slightly, taken at the base of Porcupine Lookout it shows a young Walleroo. His fur is quite dark and he blended into the background a little. He is quite a muscular chap and they always look as if they’ve been working out, I mean look at the guns on him. I have seen bigger specimens with arms like Arnie.Walleroo

That’s it for this week viewers, maybe not as exciting as some that I’ve shown but they are quite a variety, until next week, cheers.

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12 thoughts on “To Gunnedah from the Writer’s Room.

  1. kelihasablog

    I LOVE your pictures Laurie!!! The invariably make me smile or laugh… 😀 these are all good but I think the last one could be me before my coffee…LOL 😀

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Hey Keli, thanks for dropping by. I’m glad that I can make you smile, yeah the wallaroo looks a good cuppa joe wouldn’t go astray. I think you’re being hard on yourself. 🙂
      Laurie

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks, it’s actually a sculpture made of metal and I think very impressive. BTW I think I may have dropped an answer to one of your posts in Spanish. sorry about that I was answering a few and must have dropped it in your post. 🙂

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      1. Pagadan

        Laurie, happens to me all the time. What I hate is when I drop a website into the wrong folder–or somewhere. It could be anywhere!

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  2. patgarcia

    Hi Bro,
    Looking at those cottonfields made me think of my childhood. Yes, I know what cottonfields are like and may I say I even picked some of the stuff from sun up to sundown in good old Blythe and Keysville, Georgia.

    Nice pictures and I enjoyed seeing them.

    Ciao,
    Patti

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Hey Sis, I actually thought of you when I took them. Knowing you’re a Georgia girl I figured it would take you back a little. I also thought how tiring it would be picking by hand. Also Charlie Pride came to mind with ‘Cotton fields.’ Glad you liked them.
      Love
      Bro.

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  3. Raani York

    Oh Laurie! Sooooo beautiful! I love the one with the birds and the tree of course – and all the others too!
    And that brown cangaroo-bear-mouse-cow is funny. LOOOL

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Lol! Brown cangaroo-bear-mouse-cow is hilarious. They are strongly built and I don’t think he would like the description 🙂 he’s only a young one. Reminds me a bit of the Giant Mowth from the Sylvester cat cartoons. “Look father it’s a giant mowth.”
      “Don’t worry son, I’ll fix it.”
      You get my drift.
      Laurie.

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