What a show at the Writer’s Room.

I thought it would be a change to start with a look at the local Red Deer population. We were driving home the other day and as we crossed the bridge not far from home, Lorelle called out, “Deer!” I replied, “Yes, what’s up Love?” “In the creek, Deer!” “Oh.” Pulling over smartly and after a quick rummage through the back seat, I grabbed my camera and took off. There’s something about deer that brings the adrenalin out. The hinds aren’t too sure about me and they keep their young close by.

Red Deer

Now for some Australiana. For those who have followed the blog for a while, you may remember the picture I put up of the skull-like termite nest in a tree. Well, this one is about 30 metres away and it contains a Kookaburra nest. The best result will be achieved if you open in a new tab. Across the top: 1. A faint outline of something in there. 2. Yes, it’s a Kookaburra. 3. She’s not too happy at all. She flew out, I missed that, and sat in the next tree. Her feathers are ruffled, so I moved back and waited. Beautiful, I managed this shot of her flying back into the nest. Bottom left, yep, that’s her bum sticking out. She would have pecked the hole into the nest, imagine the disturbance with the thousands of termites. At least she would have a quick feed on the larvae. I’ve seen a documentary where it showed the inside of a Kookaburra’s nest. Believe me, it’s not pretty at all. When the young are being fed the inside is crawling with maggots.

Kookaburra

Clockwise, an Echidna trying to get away from the intruding lens of yours truly. We were at the Canberra Botanic gardens, I was snapping some delicate flower and Lorelle had wandered ahead, then, “Laurie quick, an Echidna.” Music to my ears, the only trouble he was 50 metres away and by the time I reached him, he was in the process of burrowing. Would he come out from under that bush? No way, if he had a finger he would have flipped it at me. So this is about the best I could get. There isn’t a lot to them, long grey snout, sharp claws and a LOT of spines. Next a Koala at the Dubbo Zoo, the enclosure was under repair and Koalas being what they are slept. This fellow heard the first click of the shutter and stretched, a little. Then bless him, he crawled out and sat in this classic pose. The bottom two are at the Japanese gardens in Cowra, the duck and the carp seem to be eyeing each other off.

Echidna

Talk about getting the eye, this turtle at the Dubbo Zoo gave me the eyeball. Those little eyes seem to bore right into you, he could do with something of a trim on his shell. The Water Dragon was sunning himself on a rock at the Botanic Gardens. I like the orange colour on his frill.

Turtle

Okay, I’ve been outed, I like waterfalls. We arrived early at the Cowra Japanese gardens, hired a buggy (that’s it in the picture) and hit the tracks. The morning light certainly softened the shrubbery.

japanese garden

I didn’t get the name of this plant, I’m sure someone may enlighten me. The flower intrigued me though, I like the contrast between the living and dead one. The grass trees at bottom right remind me of a creature from Star Wars.

page7

Sometimes a picture doesn’t need an explanation, other than it’s from the Canberra Botanic gardens.

page3

See above comment.

page5

A shearing shed on the road out of Canberra heading up to Kosciusko national park.

shearing shed

I believe this is the Orraral Homestead in Namadgi National Park, it is situated about a kilometre from the old space station mentioned in last week’s post.

old homestead

Hold the front page! I couldn’t wait until next week for this one. I took these photos last night (Thursday).The top one is of course the view from our front yard, the blue-grey cloud looks like a hand grabbing the mountain top. Twenty minutes later I was getting the lightning shots. I had the camera on the tripod and set on bulb. The middle picture was a fluke shot, I didn’t want to have the aperture open for too long so I flicked the shot off and immediately set the remote switch again and caught this. The bottom one I had set for about 6 seconds.

lightning

That’s the lot for this week, I think have covered a wide range today and as always the pictures look much better when opened in a new tab. Until next time,
Cheers,
Laurie.

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47 thoughts on “What a show at the Writer’s Room.

    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks Mary, there’s plenty to see here. Yes that turtle certainly eyeballed me. The original picture is quite large and I can bring it right up, those squinty little eyes are quite piercing.

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  1. Raani York

    So beautiful!! In particular the lightning ones. – But of course you covered the full range of my favorites again – the flowers – and the sky – and the lightning, and the animals… Thanks so much for these beautiful pictures that leave me sitting here smiling! 🙂

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      My work is done for the week, cross, ‘made Raani’s day’ off the list. I try to get a broad spectrum of pictures. Thank you for being a good chum Raani.
      Cheers
      Laurie.

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  2. kelihasablog

    Amazing, beautiful, pictures Laurie! That little turtle looks like he was just about to give you a piece of his mind…LOL I love the lightening shots… So you just set it with your aperture open longer? Maybe after I get back from this last wedding (next week) I’ll begin to be able to claim back some of my own time. It will have been a year on Jan 18th. I think I’ll be happy to see 2013 leave and pray that 2014 is better! 😀 Great writing to explain your lovely pictures for one who’d never see otherwise.

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Yeah that turtle had attitude and a moss collection to be proud of. With the lightning I put it on bulb, stick it on the tripod and use a remote button to take the shot. I only leave it open for a few seconds, or longer if you want multiple shots. There could be another way, I haven’t looked at that yet. One can only hope that next year is better, shh, don’t say it too loud. Thanks again for dropping by. 🙂

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  3. patgarcia

    Hi,
    These pictures are absolutely beautiful, and I love the first one and the last one. I have copied the last one in my iPhoto, and I hope you don’t mind. It is part of a collection of pictures by you that I will use in various articles that I write with your name listed as photographer.

    You do an excellent job at photography. Great work.

    Ciao,
    Patti

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Hi Patti, thank you so much. No worries about the pictures, as I’ve said feel free. I’m quite flattered actually that people want to use them. I do like the pictures of the storm, they are the first ones I’ve taken of lightning. 🙂
      Cheers
      Laurie.

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  4. Owls and Orchids

    I think Ray covered it all, and he was right in naming it a Gymea Lily. I live the shots of the storm. I tried with my camera but can’t get it to turn out. (Permission to copy for personal viewing?) You mentioned at Woolen Mill – my Grandad worked in a mill and I used to walk past it when I was in Primary school. He would come out onto the rear landing when school had finished and if he saw me I’d get to have a look inside. As the foreman I got the special tour and of course all the other workers there would spoil me if they could. I can still remember turning up at home with my pockets and satchel stuffed with wool 🙂 Wish I’d had a camera back then. Susan x

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      You learn something new every day Susan, a Gymea Lily. Yeah go for it with the pictures, no worries at all. Ah yes the woollen mills. I’m glad that your memories are happy ones, I’m afraid mine were of quite a different variety. Learning experiences, I keep telling myself that and will believe it one day. Oh yes a camera, I would have loved a digital camera back then, imagine the pictures one could have taken?
      Laurie.

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  5. rayjamieson

    Hey Laurie,
    GREAT Photos! No wonder the kookaburras are laughing! While the rest of the world has found incredible ways of feeding their babies, and that includes us humans, the kookaburra did the equivalent of building a maternity wing in the baby food aisle of the supermarket!

    The plant you wanted the name of I think is the Gymea Lily, but Susan will confirm that (no doubt!)… We love them, and I’d like a row of them on our driveway….

    The lightning has been pretty amazing here, we are right on the coast and the storms are going on around us each night – very noisy!

    The photo of the shearing shed takes me back. I spent years travelling with the shearers in shearing season through that country, and saw thousands of sheep pass through while I was the woolclasser.. Memory lane, with none of the potholes fixed!

    Great post, thank you,
    Ray

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks Ray, I reckon I’ll pass on the maggots though. I used to like eating my younger siblings left over baby food, except the creamed brains. Blech. A Gymea Lily eh? I was going to take names on the day but you know how it is? I love thunder storms, with all the lightning. Now I can capture it forever. 🙂 No wonder ancient cultures thought lightning came from the gods. Those streaks look like giant stick people walking out of the sky.
      I had a passing acquaintance with the wool industry. I spent six months living on a sheep property as a boy and then worked in a woollen mill for a couple of years. Working in the scours wasn’t pleasant, it was amazing what came out of those wool bales.

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  6. Patrons of the Pit

    Man, what a magnificent and beautiful country you live in, Laurie. Heap full of wierd critters and lovely views. A naturalists dream. Some day, if I get rich, I reckon to travel down there and see what it is all about.

    Cheers mate!

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    1. Pagadan

      Laurie, I enjoyed the critters and flowers, but I loved the landscapes with the shearing shed and homestead–I visit recreated villages and homesteads when I get the chance–and the views from your front yard ’cause I love clouds and lightning, etc. Ever watch the weird weather footage on the The Weather Channel?

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      1. laurie27wsmith Post author

        Hi Joy, glad you liked them, yes the landscapes are nice. Run down homesteads have always fascinated me to. They were my first lightning shots, ever on the blog so I’m happy with them. We don’t have pay TV so we don’t have the weather channel.

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    2. laurie27wsmith Post author

      There are certainly some sights to see down under. The critters are definitely weird, although you have to travel a fair way to get a change of scenery, when you do get it it’s usually worth the trip. Get a coffee table type book of your wonderful recipes going, that or a campers version of them, I’m sure you would do well. 🙂

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