Look what I found at The Writer’s Room.

I believe this is called a Bat Plant, don’t get excited I didn’t grow it, no it’s a case of me going into other people’s gardens again.

Bat Plant

A Pacific Black Duck that looks like he needs to diet, or perhaps he’s fluffing up about having his picture taken.Duck

A piece of fossilised sea bed, about 250 million years old, in the Flinders Ranges national park, South Australia.fossil

A little slice of paradise, with the peace and quiet of a shared task at hand. Ballina, NSW.beach

Fluoro daisies. The wind was blowing so I used my reflector on the black side to block it, and ended up getting a nice reflection and highlighting the centres.daises

A serene landscape can’t hide the fact that death has come and a living thing is dying. Yes the fig tree is slowly choking it’s host to death. An early winter morning last year a few kilometres from where we live.view

The Corellas were in their hundreds flying around at Lake Apex, this fellow caught my eye though.

Corella

This Frangipani tree begged to be photographed, well almost. I put the reflector up silver side around and caught some lovely, light tinges to the petals.frangipani

This steam locomotive in Parkes, NSW looked a tad horrible painted green, so I thought a little transformation to be in order.steam train

I call this one, Distance. Both my distance from them and the way the three of them are standing.  I converted it to greyscale then went heavy on the contrast, and finished it off with a touch of dark grain.

street photography

I had to put one in. Quite a nice portrait here I think. I took this in the early evening obviously at dinner time.wallaby and joey

That’s your lot for this week, I hope you enjoy and I look forward to seeing you all next week. Remember the pictures look much better opened in a new tab or window.
Cheers
Laurie.

44 thoughts on “Look what I found at The Writer’s Room.

    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      I think it’s Bruce Wayne’s unknown, younger brother sprayed with radioactive weed killer. He survived and now stands in gardens trying to look like a super hero but failing badly.😉

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  1. Raani York

    Oh – how SPECTACULAR!!! You know, I chose my favorites every single week, Laurie. This time I can’t decide between the duck and the parrot… So beautiful!!🙂

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  2. Patricia Salamone

    Beautiful and fascinating pictures Fratello. Life in all it’s glory. I will get to visit one day, I hope. :o) Looking forward to what you have in store for us next week. You and Lorelle have a great weekend. Give the Roos a big hello for me.
    Love from
    Sorella

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks so much Sorella. I like to mix them up a bit, I’m sure there’ll be something to catch your eye next week. I chat to the roos as it is so I’ll say hello,🙂
      Love
      Fratello.

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  3. Natalie Scarberry

    Wow, what you found in the writer’s room was some great photos! I’ve always wondered what frangapani looked like and now I know. Always love your photos of the roos! Blessings, Natalie 🙂

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks Natalie, yes there’s always something strange hanging around the writer’s room.🙂 The frangipani also come in yellow and white flowers. I have to put a roo in somewhere.
      Cheers
      Laurie.

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  4. Pagadan

    Love the photos–especially the frangapani (a work of art). I presume those are waves caught in a time warp in the sea bed? Good idea for the train transformation, And I like Distance; that looks like a moment frozen in time also. Oh, and the bat plant is spectacular.

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks Joy, the frangipani is an, as is photo. No painting this time. Yes the seabed is the sand formed into those ripples, then pow, it’s above sea level. Australia has been above sea level longer than any other continent. Distance is good, everybody trying not to look at each other.🙂

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  5. talain45

    Looks like a nice ease relaxed day at the writers room. Share some images, tell a little story and wish us all a joyful visit until next week. Well, if you say it like that I will then! Have a great one Laurie, enjoy🙂

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks Michael, yes it’s pretty laid back here at times, except when I’m frantically putting a selection together. I’ve never prepared them ahead, mainly because something always comes up at the last minute. One has to have that little story.🙂 Yes come on back down, you’re always welcome Michael.

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  6. olganm

    Gorgeous pictures. I’m very intrigued by the fossilised sea bed. And I’m pretty sure I’d never seen a Bat Plant. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks Olga. Yes, that hunk of seabed is interesting, ripples in the sand caught in time. I’d never seen a Bat Flower this neither so we all learnt something there.🙂

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Hi Mary, no they are found growing naturally in south-east Asia and from India to southern China. They do well here in the tropics and in greenhouses anywhere else.

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  7. suzjones

    Loved them all. Thanks for the tip about the reflector on the flowers. I love photographing flowers and often get frustrated by the breeze.🙂
    You know we should meet up one day in Brisbane and do Southbank or something – with our cameras!! lol

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks Suz, you’re welcome. Whenever I go to this garden the wind pops up, so Lorelle held the reflector for me. What a difference. We’d love to meet up for a happy snappy day. The best email addy to get me on is l27wsmith@gmail.com love to hear from you.

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  8. davidprosser

    The pictures look stunning anyway you look at them Laurie. The bat plant is absolutely fantastic. It’s fascinating to think what may have been swimming around above the sea bed and whether ant bones are actually buried in it- the forerunners of the shark maybe?

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    1. laurie27wsmith Post author

      Thanks David, if you look closely you can make out some shells. I only found the rock because a tour guide stopped and showed his client, it was kind of hidden away. There is so much to see in the way of rocks and fossils there, who knows what lurks within.
      Laurie.

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      1. laurie27wsmith Post author

        No Susan we don’t. It’s not fair to them, there’s more than enough grazing for them. If you feed them, they come to rely on you. I think they like the grass we have for the lawn, or what’s left of it after no rain for awhile now.

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